Open Access Journals



Title : Perceptions and Attitudes of Tharu Ethnic Group Towards Medicinal Ethnobiology in the Dekhatbhuli Village of Kanchanpur, Nepal
Authors : Suraj Prasad Joshi,Lata Pant,Balram Awasthi

Tharu, Medicoethnobiology, Dependency, Attitude, Perception, Conservation : In the present exploration we identify dependency pattern of Tharu ethnic group on medicinal plant and animals for traditional use and understanding their attitude as well as role in conservation. The perception of Tharu people was conducted in Dekhatbhuli village of Kanchanpur district Nepal to understanding knowledge on medicinal animal and plant species the Tharu community uses for treating different ailments. Data were collected through questionnaire survey, interviews with key informants (Bharras) and through group discussions. Random sampling method was used for selection of respondent. The result showed that the indigenous Tharu traditional healers and elders are rich in ethno medicinal knowledge. The elder people also belief in the traditional medicine and they showed the positive view towards the conservation of them were found under category not dependent. Almost all of the healer respondents were found to have played role in conservation of medicinal plant and animal and positive attitude towards conservation. The majority of elder people (97.21%) has great faith towards the traditional healer and was found to have played some role in medicinal plant and animal conservation. But, majority of young (83.53%) people have lacking of knowledge on medical ethno-biology. This vast knowledge on ethno-biology is poorly handed over to the young generation. Easy access to health services, few local healers, negligence of youngsters toward the continuation of traditional knowledge and disappearing of ethnic characters are the main challenge verge to extinction. This research will be milestone for policy making bodies and local people to aware about conservation of medical ethno biology in timely.

Keywords : Tharu , Medicoethnobiology , Dependency , Attitude , Perception , Conservation : In the present exploration we identify dependency pattern of Tharu ethnic group on medicinal plant and animals for traditional use and understanding their attitude as well as role in conservation. The perception of Tharu people was conducted in Dekhatbhuli village of Kanchanpur district Nepal to understanding knowledge on medicinal animal and plant species the Tharu community uses for treating different ailments. Data were collected through questionnaire survey , interviews with key informants (Bharras) and through group discussions. Random sampling method was used for selection of respondent. The result showed that the indigenous Tharu traditional healers and elders are rich in ethno medicinal knowledge. The elder people also belief in the traditional medicine and they showed the positive view towards the conservation of them were found under category not dependent. Almost all of the healer respondents were found to have played role in conservation of medicinal plant and animal and positive attitude towards conservation. The majority of elder people (97.21%) has great faith towards the traditional healer and was found to have played some role in medicinal plant and animal conservation. But , majority of young (83.53%) people have lacking of knowledge on medical ethno-biology. This vast knowledge on ethno-biology is poorly handed over to the young generation. Easy access to health services , few local healers , negligence of youngsters toward the continuation of traditional knowledge and disappearing of ethnic characters are the main challenge verge to extinction. This research will be milestone for policy making bodies and local people to aware about conservation of medical ethno biology in timely.
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Title : Ethnoecology of Gerres filamentosus (Cuvier, 1829) along the south Konkan coast of Maharashtra, India
Authors : L. S. Uskelwar,V. H. Nirmale,M. S. Sawant,R. A. Pawar ,A. S. Pawase,S. Y. Metar

Ethnoecology, biological studies, comparative studies, G. filamentosus, Ratnagiri and Sindhudurg districts : Ethnoecology can be understood as the ways in which people: “experience ecology, of ways in which they engage with, and build upon, the ecological relationships of which they are a part”. Investigations were carried out to collect and document the local ecological knowledge on Gerres filamentosus and compare the local knowledge on biology with biological studies and published literature. A total of 100 fishers from Ratnagiri and Sindhudurg districts constituted the sample size of the study. The ethnoecological knowledge on local name and identification of Gerres, its habitat and fishery season, size at first maturity, food and feeding and spawning season was collected. Similarly the local knowledge on effect of lunar cycle, wind direction, water colour and temperature on availability of G. filamentosus has been documented. The views of fishers on feeding habit, size at first maturity and spawning season of G. filamentosus were compared with biological studies and published literature. Mann-Whitney U-test showed agreement between local ecological knowledge, biological studies and published literature.

Keywords : Ethnoecology , biological studies , comparative studies , G. filamentosus , Ratnagiri and Sindhudurg districts : Ethnoecology can be understood as the ways in which people: “experience ecology , of ways in which they engage with , and build upon , the ecological relationships of which they are a part”. Investigations were carried out to collect and document the local ecological knowledge on Gerres filamentosus and compare the local knowledge on biology with biological studies and published literature. A total of 100 fishers from Ratnagiri and Sindhudurg districts constituted the sample size of the study. The ethnoecological knowledge on local name and identification of Gerres , its habitat and fishery season , size at first maturity , food and feeding and spawning season was collected. Similarly the local knowledge on effect of lunar cycle , wind direction , water colour and temperature on availability of G. filamentosus has been documented. The views of fishers on feeding habit , size at first maturity and spawning season of G. filamentosus were compared with biological studies and published literature. Mann-Whitney U-test showed agreement between local ecological knowledge , biological studies and published literature.
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Title : Ethnobotanical Survey of Plants Used For Prevention against Mosquito Bites and Control of Malaria In Assosa District, Western Ethiopia
Authors : Desta Ejeta Fereda

Traditional medicinal plants have played a major role in the enhancement of health care in developing countries around the world. Ethiopia has been practicing traditional botanical medicine for the curing of human biological, mental or physical disorders. Ethno botanical study was carried out to survey medicinal plants and their uses for malaria control in Assosa district. Information was collected from 150 medicinal plants users and traditional medicine healers via interviewer-administered questionnaires. The informants were selected randomly from four different villages of Assosa district, Southwestern Ethiopia. A total of 11 species of ethno botanical medicinal plants used for malaria control were identified. Of eleven ethno botanical plants, Allium sativum and Echinops kebericho were majorly used for malaria treatment and vector prevention in Assosa district. Leafs were the mostly used part of the plant and most of the medicinal plants were used for treating infections. The indigenous knowledge and practice of traditional medicinal plants in the study area were at risk of getting lost. The communities in the current study area practiced traditional ethno botanical medicine for malaria therapy and disease prevention. The indigenous practices contributed to the sustained use, management and protection of medicinal plants and multiple-use of ethno botany/indigenous trees. The current study suggests that similar studies in areas not previously covered should be carried out in order to get a full picture of the country’s medicinal plants potential in the future.

Keywords : Ethno-botany , Medicinal Plants , Mosquitoes , Malaria
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Title : In vitro response of GA3 in caulogenesis of Fiver nut
Authors : Manju Rakesh,Patil NM

A protocol was optimized for the caulogenesis of fiver nut. Internodal explant showed immediate response in shoot regeneration and production of callus in in vitro cultures of Caesalpinia bonducella (L.) Roxb. commonly known as fiver nut. MS medium supplemented with 1 to 10 mg/l GA 3 was found to induce callus. The Internodal explant inoculated on MS medium with 6 mg/l GA3 was found to produce shoots after 35 days of inoculation. Maximum amount of pale yellow coloured friable callus was produced in 7mg/l GA3 of dry weight 1.513± 0.108 g. The method can be used to generate callus and shoot which are natural sources of pharmaceutical Compounds without disturbing the natural population of the plant.

Keywords : fiver nut , caulogenesis , callus
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Title : Ethnomedicinal plants used by the Khasia Community people in Moulvibazar district of Bangladesh
Authors : Md. Sah Alam,M. Rafiqul Haider

The paper describes the traditional knowledge related to ethnomedicinal knowledge and plant parts utilization for curing various ailments by the Khasia community of Moulvibazar district. Total 45 plants were identified belonging to 37 families used by the Khasia community to treat different ailments. These medicinal plants were mostly used for treatment of anemia, asthma, cough, cold, constipation, dysentery, diarrhea, eczema, fever, headache, heart disease, itches, injury, jaundice, menstrual problem, piles, skin diseases, stomach problem, sex problems, toothache, urinary problem, rheumatism and others. Leaves were mostly used (35%), rhizome (19%) and root (12%) along with bark, stem, flowers, fruit and gum/resign.

Keywords : Ethnomedicinal , Medicinal plants , Khasia , Baidday’s , Moulvibazar , Bangladesh
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Title : Traditional knowledge on use of medicinal plants in Kitui County, Kenya
Authors : Daniel Patrick Kisangau,Matheaus Kauti,Royford Mwobobia,Titus Kanui,Nashon Musimba

Background: The use of traditional medicines in Kenya accounts for more than 70% or more of basic health-care treatments. Documentation of herbal plants is necessary because they are becoming more important, especially due to escalating costs of drugs and the focus on organic products in most developing countries. More so, with the development of resistance of pathogens to drugs, ethno-veterinary and ethno-human medicine might be the route to take since herbs tend to be broad spectrum in use. The aim of this study was to document traditional knowledge on ethnobotanical uses of medicinal plants in Kitui County. Method: Data was collected through semi-structured open-ended questionnaires administered to 68 households in the study area. Simple random sampling was used to select households who were the final sampling units. Results: Majority of the respondents (51.5%) had attended school up to primary level. Only about 6% of respondents were engaged as full-time herbalists whereas 90% had acquired traditional knowledge through informal trainings. A total of 62% of the informants acquired traditional herbal knowledge through apprenticeship from relatives with 29.4% of respondents taking between six months to one year to learn. A total of 42 plant species in 25 families were used in treating one or more disease conditions. Aloe secunduflora locally known as Kiluma was the most common medicinal plant, mentioned by 71% of the respondents. Other commonly used plants were Acacia nilotica, Zanthoxylum chalybeum and Azadirachta indica. Plucking of leaves (45.0%), digging of roots (31.4%) and debarking (11.6%) were the most commonly used methods of harvesting medicinal plants. The most commonly used plant parts were leaves (42%), stem bark (31%) and roots (21%). Acacia tortilis and Terminalia brownii were the most commonly used in the category of non-medicinal plant uses with 30% and 25% use frequencies respectively. The most common non-medicinal plant uses in the area were firewood, charcoal and animal feed. Conclusion: The study provides crucial ethnopharmacological lead towards discovery of natural drugs for treatment of both human and livestock diseases in Kitui County. The study provides platform for conservation of the documented plant resources based on their vulnerability to over-exploitation.

Keywords : Traditional knowledge , medicinal plants , Kitui
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Title : Traditional herbs used for snake bites among hill Tribes of Tamil Nadu - Literature Review
Authors : Sathish Kumar Krishnamurthy,Ranjith Kumar M.,Monisha A.

Mortality due to Snakebites occurs in South Asian countries in highest ratio, particularly in India. Giving primary care in initial stages is very crucial.[1] In India, Tribals’ save themselves using traditional medicines for many centuries including poisonous bites.[2] Tribals’ of Tamilnadu identify and preserve herbals from ancient times 2 . Literatures (Four) were identified and reviewed for ethnomedicine used among tribals of Tamilnadu for snakebites during 1990 to 2014. Among hill tribes (Palliyar, Irular and Malayali) 18 plants were identified for treating snakebites either individually or as a combination drugs. These herbs were advised with food restrictions. Literatures on ethnomedicine by Tamilnadu tribals need to be documented. We recommend training the health care units in tribal areas on knowledge of ethnomedicine in case of emergency including snake bites to save lives.

Keywords : Snake bites , hill tribes
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Title : Plants used in ethnoveterinary practices by Sugalis of Krishna District, Andhra Pradesh, India
Authors : B. Nageswara Rao Naik,Z. Vishnuvaradhan

Krishna District, Andhra Pradesh

Keywords : Ethnoveterinary medicinal plants
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Manuscript Code : The present study enumerated a total of 30 ethnoveterinary medicinal plant species used by Sugalis of Krishna district in Andhra Pradesh, India. This study gains prominence by the fact that such studies were not reported earlier from Krishna district. Nine Sugali villages (thands) constitute the present study area and information was elicited from tribal vaidyas (medical practitioners) and elderly people in the age group of 55-65 years. The 30 plant species belong to 19 different families and are used for the remedy of 10 livestock diseases. The findings of present study tally with the previous published reports in that the same plant species were used in the treatment of other veterinary ailments of livestock also. The medicinal use of these 30 plants species in conjecture with their similar utility reported earlier led to believe that the phytochemical screening of these plants would result in valuable active compounds of great veterinary significance.


Title : A comprehensive review on Psidium guajava Linn (Amaratafalam)
Authors : Raksha Mishra,Pallavi Tiwari,Mayank Srivastava,C. S. Singh,Saurav Ghoshal

Plants for thousands of years have been used to enhance health and for medicinal purposes. Psidium guajava is one which has an enormous wealth of medicinal value. Psidium guajava Linn, belonging to the Myrtaceae family, has been reported anti-diarrheal, hepatoprotective, hypoglycemic, lipid lowering, antibacterial and antioxidant activities. Psidium guajava is an important food crop and medicinal plant in tropical and subtropical countries is widely used like food and in folk medicine around of the world. The phytochemical screening of bark of Psidium guajava revealed the presence of metabolites and compounds tested for such as flavonoids, tannins, reducing sugar, terpenes, saponin, anthraquinones and alkaloids. The proximate analysis of dried bark gave a moisture content of 0.41 %, ash value of 11.5 %, acid insoluble ash of 4.5 %, Water soluble ash of 9.5 %, alcohol soluble extractive value of 20.8 % and water extractive value of 24.8 %.

Keywords : Psidium guajava L , Myrtaceae , Phytochemical constituents , Pharmacological actions
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Title : Survey and documentation of indigenous and traditional knowledge of medicinal plants used by the Irular tribe of Nilgiri District, Tamilnadu
Authors : Panneer Selvam K,R. Ezhumala,A. Vijayaragavan,M. Senthilkumar,P. Samydurai,M. Saradha,K. Praveen Kumar

An ethnobotanical survey was carried out among the ethnic groups (Irular) in Nilgiri District, Tamil Nadu. The tribal communities of Irular have rich knowledge about medicinal plants and its traditional uses. Therefore, we have done an exhaustive ethnobotanical survey in this area. In this present investigation, it is observed that the tribes being used 43 wild valuable plant species belonging to 28 families were identified with relevant information and documented in this paper with regard to their botanical name, family, vernacular name, parts used and utilization by the local tribal people for different human ailments. The common diseases treated by the herbal practitioner were asthma, cold, cough, indigestion, aphrodisiacs, paralyzes, skin diseases and diabetes.

Keywords : Ethnic groups , ITK , Irulas and skin diseases.
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